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20121212
20121212
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has been so much a part of america's history, which is our willingness to invest in the future. that investment is in our children, all children, including poor children, and modern infrastructure, in research, blue sky research. and i think that is, when we get beyond the challenge we face over these next two weeks, i think that's going to be a broader challenge we're going to face. >> we have time for one more question, over here. i just want to say how much support the president has on ensuring fair balance and -- [inaudible] >> richard with trust met andy. so we are basically a biomedical company that helps doctors collaborate better using social media. and i want to ask a question about crossing the valley of death. so our company is very fortunate that we got a small amount of innovation funding from health care their monies. but it's really a broader questions about the health care ecosystem. in silicon valley a company goes under, software engineers find new jobs in a matter of weeks. but in biotech we have people, a lot of people with ph.d's and they are much more long
views being promulgated by our parties makes strategic sense for america's future. the result has been intractablely negative public perceptions of congress. a rasmussen reports poll done just this month found that only 10% of likely voters gave congress a rating of excellent or good. for me, the irony is that having seen several generations of lawmakers pass through the body, i can attest that the vast majority are hardworking, generally interested in public service, and eager to contribute to the welfare of our country. often the public does not believe that. it's easier to assume that congressional failings arise from the incompetence or even the malfeasance of individual legislators. or perhaps, as some believe, washington, d.c. itself is corrupting. now, it's far more disconcerting to think that our democracy shortcomings are complex and devise simple solutions, but the founders were realists who understood the power of factionalism, parochialism, personal ambition. they understood that good intentions would not always prevail. and accordingly, they designed a system to check abus
effort of modern technology and of our investment in the belief that america can and should be a world leader in curing the diseases that have ailed humanity for generations. mr. president, a majority of all research scientists in human history are alive today. that remarkable fact alone carries with it great potential. that's why sandy and his wife sue created the prize to end blindness by 2020, to take advantage of this incredible historic opportunity, to bring together scientists and researchers and end blindness by the end of this decade. to inspire them, the greenbergs provided a prize of more than $2 million in gold. why gold? well, it's a reminder of the color of the beautiful shimmering sunsets that sandy and susan enjoyed together in the waning days of sandy's sightedness. and it is a reminder of the beauty, of the challenge of a prize to restore to sight the millions who live in blindness. mr. president, i'm no expert on the health or science of the eye, but we are blessed to have in this united states senate two members who are. we had some supportive comments that will be s
in the administration, there is no one in the administration who is more focused on america's long-term competitiveness, short term competitiveness, midterm competitiveness, when the president is talking about issues which are critical to him, america maintains its edges in the global economy, and all of its citizens to students to people dreaming about being the next generation of innovators, policies that helped achieve that. higher education k-12, insuring universities are still leading and citizenry is well s was sub human capital, not the best term. and achieving their dream, gene has been focused on those issues like no other. at brookings, education around the world and has written extensively about education in the united states. he is obviously enmeshed in debates on the fiscal cliff but we brought him here today to talk about long-term challenges and how we connect the dots. with that, gene sperling. [applause] >> thank you very much. it is intimidating to have already followed your panel. i like much more when you get to be the first person to mention every idea and the panel's save as gene
journalism has reported that the new america foundation. two men have returned from the country into the to the west can do more to help the syrian people. [inaudible conversations] >> welcome, everyone. welcome to c-span on the audience. i am very excited about today's events. we have two people with us that have recently come from syria that are able to give us an insight on the perspective of something that is hard to come by. in the context of the syria. to my far right is mohammed ghanem, he has a bachelor's degree in english literature, as well as graduate degree in translation from damascus university. he went on to earn a degree in conflict transformation from the center of justice and peace at the eastern mennonite university in harrisburg, virginia, and he has fought as assistant professor at princeton university. he is a long-term activists. he was active in the early days as a strategist for nonviolence. he is currently taking on the role of administrator consoles which we intend to focus on today. to my immediate right is ihan tanir. he is a washington dc correspond
their way clear to cover this hearing. people in america know far too little about what is going on in congo, and as you pointed out earlier, plus million people have died. and as we speak, people people's lives are being taken from them with this terrible rebellious m23. they do so much, this hearing is adjourned. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> coming up on c-span2, the senate banking committee looks into potential changes in providing housing assistance to low income renters. an update on planning for next month's presidential inauguration. any discussion about serious ongoing civil war. >> wednesday on "washington journal", caucus chairman john larson talks about ongoing negotiations of the so-called booklet are you then we will hear from the associated press on how congressional leaders plan to handle social security as part of the fiscal cliff talks. later, more on the role of social security would the aarp and david john of the heritage foundation. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. an official with t
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6